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arthurikCip
12-08-2015,
never ran linux/unix before. basically i rebuilt my machine and my windows 7 key is no longer working. F*** these guys im never giving them another dollar.


i really need a good recommendation for an operating system. i HEARD that slacker is the most sophisticated and polished.... im looking to avoid the "user freindly" shit if you get what i mean.... im looking to learn a bit here also

i need recommendations and suggestions... linux discussion GO

ArthurSat
12-09-2015,
what do you mean by sophisticated and polished?

popular desktop distros
ubuntu
mint
debian
opensuse

popular server distros
centos
fedora
arch
freebsd
openbsd
netbsd
solaris

popular enterprise server distros with paid support
suse
redhat

Arthurvuse
12-10-2015,
f you're new to linux I'd suggest trying out Xubuntu. It has the familiar XP style desktop (especially after a few tweaks) is light and has the popular support of Ubuntu behind it.

I would not venture to the insanity of what has become Ubuntu/Unity or even the KDE derivatives if you're used to the windows UI.

Linux gaming is at a turning point but it's still too early to even hope you're going to get any windows gaming done through wine. Also an nvidia graphics card that's 6+ months old is the best bet for a linux computer. ATI works too, but drivers are still glitchier and slower.

asoleggrus
12-11-2015,
by "sophisticated and polished"... i heard other ones that are more user freindly tend to be buggy... im willing to learn even if its a rocky start with a skill learning curve


i was in line at microcenter tonight started talkin with the guy in front of me he said he runs mint so im givin that a try since i hear it installs all your drivers for you

Arturooa
12-12-2015,
Actually if you're looking for hardcore and won't mind having to LEARN STUFF then arch linux is your choice. You can build it up from scratch and you're going to have to understand how linux works if you want it to work.

Arch will get the cutting edge code updates far before Ubuntu or Mint, too.

But I would warmly suggest to you to first install Xubuntu, learn the basics - then dig into arch. Ubuntu is the best choice because it has most users and probably one of the best if not best hardware support out of the box. Your learning process will become extremely hard if you install a non-friendly version and can't even get desktop working because of lack of knowledge.

Remember that the distros cost you nothing but your time. Have an adventure, install as many as you like.