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  1. #1

    Oculus VR founder: We'll support Mac 'if Apple ever releases a good computer'

    In January, virtual reality specialist Oculus VR opened pre-orders for its long-awaited headset, the Rift, priced at $599. In order to use the device, the company recommends that you have a mighty PC with some pretty fierce specs, including an Intel Core i5 4590 processor (or above/newer), NVIDIA GTX 970 / AMD R9 290 graphics card (or better), 8GB of RAM, HDMI-out, and 3 USB 3.0 ports + 1 USB 2.0 port.

  2. #2
    However, Oculus is only supporting Windows PCs for now, having 'paused' development efforts on OS X and Linux last year - but as far as OS X goes, it doesn't look like support for the Rift will be coming any time soon.
    In an interview with ShackNews, Oculus VR founder Palmer Luckey was asked if Mac support was still in the works for the Rift. He replied: "That is up to Apple. If they ever release a good computer, we will do it."
    He continued, "It just boils down to the fact that Apple doesn't prioritize high-end GPUs. You can buy a $6,000 Mac Pro with the top-of-the-line AMD FirePro D700, and it still doesn't match our recommended specs."
    Luckey added that, "if they prioritize higher-end GPUs like they used to for a while back in the day, we'd love to support Mac. But right now, there's just not a single machine out there that supports it."






  3. #3
    Ouch.
    It’s interesting that Apple has not put in the effort to either maximize their GPU output or provide higher end MAC’s with better GPU’s, or that Oculus has such high system requirements. I tend to believe the former since my nephew says he can’t stand gaming on a MAC even though he bleeds Apple products.

  4. #4
    The market for Mac Pros are CPU centric, hence why they come equipped with Xeons and not i7s.
    Also, the Firepro line is like the Quadro and Tesla line. They have massive amounts of memory and are more geared towards CPU like workloads. They aren’t gaming GPUs. I don’t think Apple has ever really prioritized gaming in their systems in the last couple of years.

  5. #5
    The market for Mac Pros are OpenCL centric, hence why you can’t even buy one without dual GPUs.
    Xeons are largely the same as i7s, but with support for ECC memory. Some people have bought lower end Xeons for gaming rigs and that worked just fine, and was the one place you could get Intel CPUs without GPUs bolted on.
    FirePros are Radeons with different drivers that are certified for professional apps. The chip itself is identical, perhaps configured with different numbers of shaders at most. In fact, on the Mac Pro, booting into Windows just shows them as standard Radeon chips, while since Apple controls the driver under OSXthey show up as Firepros there.

  6. #6
    content from reference site

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